Workplace Happiness—and Not So Much

What are the happiest and unhappiest jobs in the U.S. economy?   Put another way, what careers would you want to steer your children and grandchildren toward and away from if you want them to be happy during their work hours?

Recently, CareerBliss, a fulfillment-focused job search website that collects more than six million independent company reviews and three million job listings, has reported on the jobs that provide the most and least personal satisfaction.

Number one on the “happiest” list: recruiters, who basically sell the merits of their company to prospective employees.  After that, there was a strong tech theme to happiness at work.  The number two happiest job: full-stack developer—basically a programmer who creates customized web and mobile applications.  Research assistants, senior Java developers, Android developers, chief technology officers, lead engineers, lead developers, software engineers and chief operating officers round out the top ten.

The bottom job on the list was sales account manager, whose workers were considered a bit less happy than security officers.  Merchandisers, cashiers, drivers, maintenance managers, guards, sales professionals, machine operators and service technicians rounded out the bottom ten.

CareerBliss also listed the happiest cities to work in, and six of the top 20 happen to be located in California: Santa Clara (1), San Jose (2), San Francisco (5), San Diego (10), Los Angeles (11) and Irvine (19).  Portland, Oregon (3), Cincinnati, Ohio (4), Austin, Texas (6), Nashville, Tennessee (7), Boston, Massachusetts (8) and Washington, D.C. (9) were also reported to be high on the happiness scale.

About the Author: Bob Veres has been a commentator, author and consultant in the financial services industry for more than 20 years.  Over his 20-year career in the financial services world, Mr. Veres has worked as editor of Financial Planning magazine; as a contributing editor to the Journal of Financial Planning; as a columnist and editor-at-large of Dow Jones Investment Advisor magazine; and as editor of Morningstar’s advisor web site: MorningstarAdvisor.com.

Mr. Veres has been named one of the most influential people in the financial planning profession by Investment Advisor magazine and Financial Planning magazine, was granted the NAPFA Special Achievement Award by the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors, and most recently the Heart of Financial Planning Distinguished Service Award from the Denver-based Financial Planning Association. 

Source:

https://www.careerbliss.com/facts-and-figures/careerbliss-happiest-and-unhappiest-jobs-in-america-2016/

https://www.careerbliss.com/facts-and-figures/careerbliss-2017-happiest-cities-to-work/

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