Category Archives: Stock Index

The Election’s Impact on Your Portfolio

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By now, most voters have made up their mind about who they want to serve as their next President.  But what can they look forward to, from an investment and tax standpoint, if their candidate wins or loses?  How will the election affect their portfolio and future net worth?

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Brexit Update

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Remember Brexit?  Of course you do.  Many short-term traders thought the sky was falling when British voters unexpectedly decided to opt their country out of the European Union.  But the process of extricating the British economy from the complexities of European membership has been deliberate and thoughtful—on both sides.

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Riding the Coaster

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With the benefit of hindsight, we can see that it would have been a bad idea to sell your stock holdings after the Brexit vote; you would have locked in a 5% to 10% loss in a market that eventually trended upward to new record highs.  The same is true of the aftermath of the World Court decision that slapped China in the face by declaring that man-made islands don’t transform an ocean into territorial waters, the attempted coup in Turkey, or, really, any other alarming headline which doesn’t materially affect a company’s ability to run its operations.

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A Market High—But Is It a Market Top?

 

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In case you hadn’t noticed, the S&P 500 index reached record territory yesterday, and the Nasdaq briefly crossed over the 5,000 level before settling back with a more modest gain.  At 2,137.6, the S&P 500 finished above the previous high of 2,130.82, set on May 21, 2015.

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The Drama on Wall Street

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Have your long-term financial goals changed in the last three days?

Are American companies less valuable because investors in China are panicking?

Is there any reason to think that because Chinese investors are panicking, that Chinese companies are less valuable today than they were a few days ago?

These are the kinds of questions to ponder as you watch the U.S. stock market catch a cold after China sneezed.  In each of the first four trading days of the year, China closed its markets due to a rapid fall in share prices—a move which may have made the panic worse, since it made investors fear being trapped in stocks that are seen as dropping in value.  It’s unclear exactly how or why, but the panic spread to global markets, with U.S. stocks falling 4.9% to mark the worst first-of-the-year drop in history.

For long-term investors, the result is much the same as if you went to the grocery store and discovered that the prices had fallen roughly 5% across the board.  At first, you might think this is a great bargain. But then you might wonder whether the prices will be even lower tomorrow or next week.  One thing you probably WOULDN’T worry about is whether prices will eventually go back up; you know they always have in the past after these sale events expire.

Will they?  The truth is, nobody knows—and if you see pundits on TV say with certainty that they know where the markets are going, your first impulse should be to laugh, and your second should be to check their track record for predicting the future.  Without a working crystal ball, it’s hard to know whether the markets are entering a correction phase which will make stocks even cheaper to buy, or whether people will wake up and realize that they don’t have to share the panic of Chinese investors on this side of the ocean.  The good news is there appears to be no major economic disruption like the Wall Street derivatives mess that triggered the 2008 downturn.  The best, sanest investors will once again watch the markets for entertainment purposes—or just turn the channel.

About the Author: Bob Veres has been a commentator, author and consultant in the financial services industry for more than 20 years.  Over his 20-year career in the financial services world, Mr. Veres has worked as editor of Financial Planning magazine; as a contributing editor to the Journal of Financial Planning; as a columnist and editor-at-large of Dow Jones Investment Advisor magazine; and as editor of Morningstar’s advisor web site: MorningstarAdvisor.com.

Mr. Veres has been named one of the most influential people in the financial planning profession by Investment Advisor magazine and Financial Planning magazine, was granted the NAPFA Special Achievement Award by the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors, and most recently the Heart of Financial Planning Distinguished Service Award from the Denver-based Financial Planning Association. 

Sources:

Global assets shaken by China market turmoil – FT.com

Global markets were in tumult on Thursday after attempts by Chinese authorities to support share prices and the currency raised fresh questions about their ability to manage a slowdown in the world’s second-largest economy. The Shanghai stock market

US bond yields sound warning on economy – FT.com

The US government bond market is blowing raspberries at the Federal Reserve. This could indicate trouble ahead for the American economy. Last month, the Fed lifted interest rates for the first time in nine years, and short-term bond yields have duly

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Irrelevant Ups and Downs 

downloadThe U.S. stock market gained 2.05% recently, the biggest one-day gain for the S&P 500 index since early September.  Of course, this comes after the same index was down 1.1% (Wednesday) and 1.4% (Thursday).

What’s going on?

Of course, no person alive knows exactly what drives the psychology of millions of investors, despite the confident analyses you read in the papers and see on cable financial news channels.   Yes, on Wednesday and Thursday, some investors may have been disappointed that the European Central Bank provided only the stimulus to the European economies that it had promised—when everybody seemed to be expecting more.  Analysts said that the rally on Friday was due to the encouraging jobs report issued by the Labor Department, which told us that 211,000 net jobs had been created in November, rather than the 200,000 that had been forecast.

But does any of this make sense?  Stimulating the European economy means more potential buyers for American goods and potentially more euros to buy them with.  Shouldn’t that cause American stocks to be MORE valuable than they were before?  The jobs data, meanwhile, means there will be more competition for workers, which often leads to higher wages and correspondingly diminished corporate profits.  Above and beyond that, the reassuring employment picture means that the Federal Reserve Board is now nearly certain to allow short-term interest rates to rise on December 16.  Shouldn’t that cause stocks to be less valuable?

The truth is that none of these events causes stocks to change their real intrinsic value in the least, and you should be skeptical every time you hear journalists draw links between headlines and stock movements.  The magnitude of the shifts should be a clue; how can a company—let alone a basket of 500 companies—be worth 2% more one day than it was yesterday?  Did they all win the lottery?  Did they all get caught making significant accounting errors that understated their earnings?  How much more likely is it that investors have to make guesses—sometimes wild ones—as to the value of companies, getting it more or less right over time, but constantly over- and under-shooting in their daily guesses?  If you follow this line of reasoning, it is helpful to note that the value of U.S. stocks, despite all this back and forth action, was essentially unmoved for the week, and pretty much unmoved for the year.

The markets may go back down on Monday, or they might soar.  This year may or may not end with a net gain.  None of that matters to your portfolio, which is slowly increasing in value to the extent that the companies you own are building value in ways that have nothing to do with the headlines.  If the world comes to an end, that will have an impact on the markets that we can measure with some precision.  Short of that, short-term market movements, and particularly the explanations that writers and pundits attach to them, are entertainment—and not especially entertaining at that.

Our recommendation?  Go watch a movie instead.

About the Author: Bob Veres has been a commentator, author and consultant in the financial services industry for more than 20 years.  Over his 20-year career in the financial services world, Mr. Veres has worked as editor of Financial Planning magazine; as a contributing editor to the Journal of Financial Planning; as a columnist and editor-at-large of Dow Jones Investment Advisor magazine; and as editor of Morningstar’s advisor web site: MorningstarAdvisor.com.

Mr. Veres has been named one of the most influential people in the financial planning profession by Investment Advisor magazine and Financial Planning magazine, was granted the NAPFA Special Achievement Award by the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors, and most recently the Heart of Financial Planning Distinguished Service Award from the Denver-based Financial Planning Association. 

Sources:

Indexes Erase Thursday Loss; Ulta, Alaska Lead IBD 50

Stocks rallied across much of the session Friday, as a strong November jobs report overpowered a sharp pullback in oil prices and many energy stocks. The Nasdaq and the S&P 500 both popped 2.1%. Preliminary data showed those moves carrying in weak trade.

AP News – ECB stimulus falls short of hype, causing market plunge

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) – The European Central Bank on Thursday ramped up efforts to stimulate the sluggish eurozone economy, but the measures fell far short of what investors had expected and stocks took a painful tumble.

Jobless rate stays at 5% in November, clearing way for Fed

Bloomberg 12/4/2015 Victoria Stilwell Employers added more jobs than forecast in November, underscoring Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen’s confidence that the U.S. economy is strong enough to withstand higher borrowing costs. The 211,000 increase in payrolls followed a 298,000 gain in October that was bigger than previously estimated, a Labor Department report showed Friday.

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