Category Archives: Trends

Where the Traffic Goes

The World Wide Web casts a pretty large net: we now have more than 1.1 billion websites featuring 4.48 billion pages—up from one website in 1991.

But when you look at web traffic, most of us actually visit one of the 100 most popular sites.  Google controls four of those: Google itself, with 28 billion visits a year, Youtube.com, which brings in 20.5 billion visits a year, plus Blogger and Google User Content.  A site with just one million visits per month is ranked somewhat lower: it would be the 33,000th most popular site.
The graphic shows that the “spoils” (or “eyeballs”) on the Web tend to go to the very top of the food chain, and there are millions of websites that almost no one (except Google’s automated crawler) has ever seen.

About the Author: Bob Veres has been a commentator, author and consultant in the financial services industry for more than 20 years.  Over his 20-year career in the financial services world, Mr. Veres has worked as editor of Financial Planning magazine; as a contributing editor to the Journal of Financial Planning; as a columnist and editor-at-large of Dow Jones Investment Advisor magazine; and as editor of Morningstar’s advisor web site: MorningstarAdvisor.com.

Mr. Veres has been named one of the most influential people in the financial planning profession by Investment Advisor magazine and Financial Planning magazine, was granted the NAPFA Special Achievement Award by the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors, and most recently the Heart of Financial Planning Distinguished Service Award from the Denver-based Financial Planning Association. 

Sources:

http://www.worldwidewebsize.com/

Total number of Websites – Internet Live Stats

How many websites are there on the Web? Number of websites by year and growth from 1991 to 2016. Historical count and popular websites starting from the first website until today. Charts, real time counter, and interesting info.

http://www.visualcapitalist.com/100-websites-rule-internet/

Kindle

Executive Compensation Bloat

We heard a lot about income inequality and the stagnating incomes of middle class Americans on the campaign trail last year, and Wall Street firms that mostly move money around rightly got some of the blame.  But hardly anybody talked about how CEOs routinely loot the treasuries of their own companies, taking money out of the pockets of stock investors and shareholders who they theoretically work for.

Continue reading Executive Compensation Bloat

Kindle

Longer Lives, Here and Abroad

For years, the U.S. life expectancy was among the longest in the world, a natural byproduct of the fact that the U.S. is wealthier, per capita, than other nations.  Indeed, a research report in the medical journal The Lancet projects that between now and 2030, women in the U.S. will live an average 83.3 years (up from 81.2 today) and men an average of 79.5 years (up from 76.5 today).

Continue reading Longer Lives, Here and Abroad

Kindle

Depression’s Silver Lining

A lot of people are depressed these days: in 2015, one study showed that 6.7% of American adults suffered from a major depressive episode in the previous 12 months.  Meanwhile, an estimated 12% of Americans are taking antidepressants, which suggests that the study may have underestimated the problem.

Continue reading Depression’s Silver Lining

Kindle

The 25 Worst Passwords

How secure are the passwords you use to access your banking or investment data?  A recent article in Forbes magazine surveyed security company SplashData’s password dumps, looking for the world’s most common—and, therefore, easiest to guess—passwords.  This is a big problem; SplashData estimates that just over 10% of people use at least one of the 25 most common passwords.  Guess which words hackers and cyberthieves are going to guess first when they try to hack into the account that contains your banking information?

Continue reading The 25 Worst Passwords

Kindle

The Disruptors and the Disrupted

uber

You know that online technologies are turning whole industries upside down.  Think Uber vs. the taxi industry, or Airbnb vs. hotels.  But has anybody assembled a comprehensive look at the new platforms and what are threatened by platform technologies?

Continue reading The Disruptors and the Disrupted

Kindle

Get Ready for Weird Food

Food

Are you ready to start eating bugs?  Or or goldfish muscle dipped in fetal bovine serum?  Scientists point out that people 100 years ago probably would have barfed at the sight of a Twinkie and would have had trouble comprehending a Dorito.  So, looking ahead 100 years, they’re predicting that the food people typically consume will get weird in ways that are surprisingly predictable.

Continue reading Get Ready for Weird Food

Kindle